What is the size of your ring? If you don’t know your size, shopping for rings (particularly online) can be a minefield, and buying the wrong band may be both irritating and costly. So, how do you determine your ring size and ensure that it is correct? We’re here to assist you because it might be difficult to figure out.

When it comes to ring sizes, everyone is different: a smaller-framed individual may have larger-than-average fingers, and vice versa, so there’s no way to anticipate your ring size based on your clothes size or anything else.

If you’re buying a costly or meaningful ring to wear every day, getting the size correct is critical since you don’t want to lose it or find it too tight.

While less priced rings might be more versatile in terms of size (particularly if you’re happy to wear them on any finger), it’s still crucial to have a solid sense of the size range you’ll require.

Because we want online ring purchasing to be as simple as possible for you, we’ve created this helpful Ring Size Measuring Guide – hooray!

See ring sizes in mm and inches, as well as convert between Australian, British, US, and Asian ring sizes for both women and men, in our Ring Size Chart & Conversion Guide.

Let’s get this party started…

OUR BEST RING SIZE INSTRUCTIONS: Here are our best ring size instructions for measuring your ring size at home. Of course, you may get your ring size measured more precisely in person at a manufacturing jewellery store.

WHEN SHOULD YOU MEASURE?
Keep in mind that the size of your fingers will alter during the day and over longer periods of time. Hormones, weather, medicine, hydration, and other factors might cause your fingers to become bigger in the nights.

Given this, measuring for a ring numerous times over the course of a day or even a few days to get the optimal size for you is a smart idea.

Most essential, the ring size you pick should be comfortable in the evening when your fingers are more likely to grow in size due to heat.

WHERE SHOULD A RING BE FITTED?
Ultimately, it boils down to what you’re most at ease with the most of the time. As a general rule, your ring should be snug enough to not come off, but loose enough to go over your knuckle without issue and to accommodate natural fluctuations in finger size that occur during the day (and each month for many women).

WHAT IF YOUR RING SIZE IS NOT AVAILABLE IN YOUR EXACT SIZE?
Because there are so many distinct ring sizes, jewellery retailers (including our online jewellery shop) will only stock a small number of them. What do you do if your precise ring size isn’t available in the shop and custom sizes aren’t an option?

The size that is closest to your ring size measurement is the best choice, as long as the discrepancy isn’t too significant. If you don’t fit within the store’s standard sizes, you could be out of luck, since a ring that’s far too big or too little for any of your fingers is unlikely to fit, no matter how much you want it.

Given how significant (and frequently costly) these rings are, and the fact that you’ll most likely be wearing them all day, every day for years to come, I don’t advocate purchasing wedding, engagement, or similar rings without having a correctly sized band fashioned for you.

ARE YOU BETTER OFF GOING LARGER OR SMALLER?
If you’re in between ring sizes or see a significant change in your size throughout the day, remember that it’s usually preferable to opt for a little bigger size than one that’s too tiny, so err on the side of caution. Nothing is more irritating than a ring that is excessively tight on your finger or that you are unable to remove if necessary.

RINGS WITH A WIDE BAND
If you’re buying a ring or a ring set with a broad band (more than 7mm or 0.27″), you’ll need to go up a size. If you’re using US numerical sizes, go up half a size, or a full size if you’re using the Australian and British alphabetical ring sizing systems.

KNUCKLES WITH LARGE KNUCKLES
If you have bigger knuckles, keep in mind that the ring must be able to glide over your knuckle without issue. This is especially true for those who have arthritis in their finger joints, so take extra caution when measuring your ring size if you have this condition.

You should also measure your knuckle and the portion of your finger where the ring will rest to accommodate for this. Choose a ring size that falls between your finger and knuckle sizes, then double-check that it will fit over your knuckle.

WHICH MEASUREMENT SYSTEM SHOULD BE USED?
Various countries employ different measurement methods, which adds to the intricacy of ring sizes. The following are the two most common:

In Australia, the United Kingdom, and other nations, alphabetical (or Wheat Sheaf) ring sizes are used (for men and women)
In the United States, Canada, and parts of Asia, numerical ring sizes are utilised (for men and women)
The numerical ring size system or the alphabetical sizing method can both be used to order a ring. Both approaches are used to determine ring sizes for men and women. Different nations’ jewellers will be familiar to their own ring size systems, but they should be able to translate the sizes rather readily.

We utilise both of these methods for ring sizes at Simone Walsh Jewellery, so you may tell us which one you have.

For additional information, see our ring size conversion table.

SIZES OF THE MOST COMMON RINGS
The most prevalent ring sizes for women are as follows:

AU/UK: L12 or US: 6 AU/UK: N12 or US: 7 AU/UK: P12 or US: 8 AU/UK: R12 or US: 9 AU/UK: R12 or US: 9
The size of a letter or number decreases as it gets lower.